Spirit: a retrospective 2021 | Bangarra Dance Theatre

Image by Jacquie Manning

After a long interruption to performing in 2020, Bangarra return to the stage with Spirit, a show comprised of pieces from their repertoire over 31 years. The performance represents an opportunity for healing and reconnecting as Artistic Director Stephen Page says, “Dance is our medicine, a practice which connects the past, present and future through the communication, and passing on, of cultural knowledge.”

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Dorr-e Dari: A Poetic Crash Course in the Language of Love | PYT Fairfield

Image by Anna Kucera

It seems every few months another newspaper publishes a think-piece about how technology or millennials are degrading language and the art of communication. In this confessional lecture-style theatre piece, three poetry enthusiasts unravel the thousand-years-old tradition of Persian poetry as a courtship ritual, a fortune teller, and a wise guide to life.

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Maureen: Harbinger of Death | Jonny Hawkins & Nell Ranney

Image by Yaya Stempler

There’s a phenomenon often discussed amongst women where you reach a certain age and suddenly become invisible. Because you’ve passed through the three layers of societally recognised womanhood, (ie virgin, desirable, mother), you’re no longer relevant or worthy of attention. In this new show, creators Jonny Hawkins and Nell Ranney turn all the attention to older women and pay tribute to their stories in a conglomerate homage character named Maureen the Harbinger of Death.

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Humans 2.0 | Circa

Image by Yaya Stempler

Much of circus is about the spectacle; making unbelievable feats of human strength and agility effortless and entertaining. After the success of Humans at Sydney Festival in 2017, Circa returns with the revamped Humans 2.0 which examines touch, intimacy, connection in the wake of COVID-19.

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AutoCannibal | Oozing Future

Image by Yaya Stempler

We see a lot of references flying around comparing our current circumstances to post-apocalyptic or dystopian imaginaries like 1984 or Brave New World. In AutoCannibal, Mitch Jones stretches contemporary crises of environmental collapse, the refugee crisis, and poverty to their extreme dystopic conclusion: self-cannibalism.

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Sunshine Super Girl | Andrea James & Performing Lines

Image by Yaya Stempler

The controversy of a mid-pandemic Australian Open currently playing out across the news stations is a reminder of the place of tennis in Australia’s self-mythology; what the sport symbolises at home but also how it identifies the nation internationally. In Sunshine Super Girl, Andrea James tells the story of Evonne Goolagong Cawley, a trailblazer in tennis throughout the 1970s.

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The Last Season | Force Majeure

Image by Yaya Stempler

In modern times it feels like every season brings a new crisis whether economic, social, environmental, or a combination of all three. Using Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons as inspiration, Force Majeure’s The Last Season explores intergenerational relationships through the increasing pressures on society as we know it.

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Future Remains | Sydney Chamber Opera

Image by Lisa Tomasetti

Beginning with an unsettling and predatory story of infatuation and ending in wild violent abandon, this mash-up performance of Leoš Janáček’s Diary of One Who Disappeared and Huw Belling’s response piece Fumeblind Oracle combine to explore classical themes of desire and revenge under strobing lights.

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poem for a dried up river | Jane Sheldon & Sydney Chamber Opera

Image by Lisa Tomasetti

The environment and its vast network of interconnected systems often get discussed in enormous scales of time, space, and impact. For the average person, comprehending these huge scales is daunting. In poem for a dried up river, Jane Sheldon and Sydney Chamber Opera collaborate to experiment with mixing big and small in the story of a tiny creature’s Herculean task.

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The Visitors | Moogahlin Performing Arts

Image by Jamie James

Inspired by the jury room drama Twelve Angry Men, Jane Harrison’s new play imagines those fateful days in January 1788 when the First Fleet entered Sydney Harbour. The seven surrounding clan leaders gather to hold a tense discussion about whether to welcome these visitors or turn them away before it’s too late.

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