Light Shining in Buckinghamshire | Belvoir

Image by Teniola Komolafe

While it might not seem that a play about the English Civil Wars and the Putney Debates of 1640s England would have much resonance in 21st century Australia, Caryl Churchill’s framing, even some 45 years after the first staging, see our protests as rehashings of the same concerns of religious freedom, democracy, and social justice.

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Wayside Bride | Belvoir

Image by Brett Boardman

This review comes from Night Writes guest reviewer Josephine Lee

Wayside Bride is a new Australian play that celebrates the heartaches and beauty of Wayside Chapel in Kings Cross. Around 2016, the playwright Alana Valentine put a call out for stories of people who were married there and, over the years of interviewing, listening and writing, she has created this play. With a mix of verbatim storytelling and time travel, she shines a spotlight on the importance of community and social work in preserving this remarkable piece of Australian history.

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Grey Rhino | Charmene Yap & Cass Mortimer Eipper with Performing Lines

Image by Daniel Boud

American policy analyst Michele Wucker in her 2016 book the Gray Rhino referred to dangers people choose to ignore as “A highly probable, high-impact threat: something we ought to see coming, like a two-tonne rhinoceros aiming its horn in our direction and preparing to charge.” Inspired by this quote Grey Rhino explores the way people deny, ignore, and procrastinate on impending problems to their own detriment.

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Honour | Ensemble Theatre

Image by Prudence Upton

This review comes from Night Writes guest reviewer Gabriella Florek

It must be so delicious for any writer to experience the audible gasp, groan, or outburst of an audience reacting to a punchy line, a witty comeback, or a harsh truth. Joanna Murray-Smith’s Honour has no shortage of these. Her play is cleverly punctuated by all those things I imagine people wish they had said or perhaps have said in a painful or awkward moment.

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The Last Season | Force Majeure

Image by Yaya Stempler

In modern times it feels like every season brings a new crisis whether economic, social, environmental, or a combination of all three. Using Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons as inspiration, Force Majeure’s The Last Season explores intergenerational relationships through the increasing pressures on society as we know it.

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Things I Know To Be True | Belvoir

Image by Heidrun Löhr

Loving someone, especially family, is a constant reckoning. Growing up, learning more about yourself, and making life-shaping decisions change the makeup of relationships and family dynamics, sometimes irreparably. In Andrew Bovell’s newest drama, Things I Know To Be True, the Price family meets a period of great change head-on.

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