Deep and Meaningful | Sydney Fringe Festival

An uninvited guest has arrived at this party: a blackhole. The threat of the end of the world puts a certain strained pressure on the loose, confessional deep and meaningful conversation customary at the end of all good Australian house parties. Suddenly this low-key hang has become a last opportunity to open up, right wrongs, and connect with the people around us.

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Anatomy of a Suicide | Sugary Rum Productions, Chopt Logic & Seymour Centre

Image by Phil Erbacher

This review comes from Night Writes guest reviewer Gabriella Florek

Even before the show began, one of the immediately striking things about this production of Anatomy of a Suicide was the set. The space comprised what looks like a single room with three doors, each one featuring a large window built into it. Hanging behind and above the doors, identical lights, and lastly, also behind the doors, an assortment of household objects, a table, a bathtub, chairs. We had the feeling of being in someone’s intimate space or, at least, the potential for someone’s intimate space. But, at the same time, there was something clinical about it. It was too clean, too bright, too light-filled. It was almost as if by virtue of being here to witness the story, the audience had transgressed something private. The house had been polished clean, hiding evidence of whatever dark horrors had occurred or that might be about to unfold.

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ScatterGun After the Death of Rūaumoko | Sydney Fringe Festival

What does it mean to mourn, to grieve, to continue living after death? Where does one spirit fit into the expansive universe of spirits, gods, and natural forces that stretch out into eternity? In a combination of poetry, theatre, movement, and music, solo performer Ana Chaya Scotney takes the audience on a journey through space, time, and dimension.

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Not Today | Rogue Projects

Image by Cameron Grant

There’s a lot of talk in the media about millennials and young people ruining the economy by not buying houses or ruining traditional families by not getting married or having kids but there aren’t nearly enough conversations with actual young people about what they want the world to look like. Not Today dives directly into one twenty-something’s mind as she navigates grief, guilt, and overwhelming anxiety about climate change.

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Introducing Aunty Jude | Hurrah Hurrah

Jazzercise? Over. Water aerobics? Lame. Zumba? Yeah right. The future is shoulder dancing. If you’ve ever wanted to bring the true aunty energy to a party, look no further than the sacred shoulder dance as taught by renowned shoulder dancing expert Aunty Jude. Wow your family and friends like never before, but beware the sweat, and also the animate lighting display just over Aunty Jude’s shoulder.

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Alone | Dusty Room Productions & Glow House Ltd

What’s it going to take to save the Earth and, more specifically, the human race from climate change? Moving to Mars? Building a large enough space craft to hold the entire population? Or maybe a tiny little micro-organism found on a far distant planet that eats carbon at an unbelievable rate? The flight crew of the Lily of the Nile have staked everything on that little purple plant but first they have to bring it safely home.

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Rough Trade | Joy Minter & Sydney Fringe Festival

Image by Clare Hawley

Nobody likes Mark Zuckerberg and many people translate their dislike into deleting the ubiquitous Facebook app. But for many others, the social media platform remains an essential tool for connection and, for some others, survival. They gather in groups like Rough Trade, developing community that traverses digital and real life divides.

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Before the Meeting | White Box Theatre & Seymour Centre

Image by Danielle Lyonne

Most people are routine orientated. They’re how we structure our lives and ourselves, form new habits or get rid of old ones. Routines are how we show our productivity, our values, and how we work towards our dreams. That’s why they’ve been a cornerstone of addiction recovery for decades, baked into the rhetoric along with the Twelve Steps to help newly sober people reorder and rebuild their lives.

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Heroes of the Fourth Turning | Outhouse Theatre Co & Seymour Centre

Image by Richard Farland

After Donald Trump’s election in 2016, political analysts, journalists, and general citizens the world over were scratching their heads, wondering where it all went wrong. Many blamed “backwards” religious zealots from mysterious middle America who didn’t know any better. But in the ensuing years, which have seen increased popularity and visibility of far-right ideology, the gap of misunderstanding and miscommunication has only seemed to get bigger.

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The Museum of Modern Love | Seymour Centre

Image by Ten Alphas

In 2010, Serbian performance artist Marina Abramović completed one of her most famous performances, The Artist Is Present at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, where she sat still and silent opposite an empty chair in which audience members were invited to sit and stare at her. The work ran from March to May and garnered responses from art critics, celebrities, and ordinary people from all over the world. The Stella Prize winning novel by Heather Rose, now adapted for the stage, imagines the lives of some of the audience members to Abramović’s performance and the impact it had on them.

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