Rich Kids: A History of Shopping Malls in Tehran | Javaad Alipoor Company and National Theatre of Parramatta

Image by Peter Dibdin

If global crises like climate change or COVID-19 make anything clear, it’s that the wealthy and the poor are living in completely different version of reality. Some can have whatever they want whenever they want it while others are literally struggling to keep their heads above water. This second instalment of a trilogy in Javaad Alipoor’s “state of the world” theatre-making takes on wealth, power, and Instagram.

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Yung Lung | Chunky Move

Image by Yaya Stempler

Every few months someone on Twitter will dig up a famously ironic quote from scientist Clifford Stoll in a 1995 MPR interview discussing the future of the Internet: “I think it’s grossly oversold and within two or three years people will shrug and say, ‘Uh yep, it was a fad of the early 90’s and now, oh yeah, it still exists but hey, I’ve got a life to lead and work to do. I don’t have time to waste online.'” Thinking about how wrong he was is either funny or chilling, depending on your own predictions for the future.

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Grey Rhino | Charmene Yap & Cass Mortimer Eipper with Performing Lines

Image by Daniel Boud

American policy analyst Michele Wucker in her 2016 book the Gray Rhino referred to dangers people choose to ignore as “A highly probable, high-impact threat: something we ought to see coming, like a two-tonne rhinoceros aiming its horn in our direction and preparing to charge.” Inspired by this quote Grey Rhino explores the way people deny, ignore, and procrastinate on impending problems to their own detriment.

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Green Park | Griffin Theatre Company

Image by Wendell Teodoro

Two strangers meet in a park ostensibly for a simple hook-up. But they each want something from the other and they aren’t being entirely honest about it either. As darkness falls and the sounds of evening traffic creeps in, the carefully hidden aspects of their lives begin to infiltrate their rendezvous and unsettle their strange acquaintance.

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Wudjang: Not the Past | Bangarra Dance Theatre & Sydney Theatre Company

Image by Daniel Boud

When the future or even the present feel so pressing it can be difficult to see the relevance of old stories and traditions. But in this collaborative performance between Bangarra Dance Theatre and Sydney Theatre Company, the past is shown to be ongoing with powerful lessons that ancestors can teach about resilience and care.

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Killing Katie: Confessions of a Book Club | Ensemble Theatre

Image by Lisa Tomasetti

Friendships are delicate things and they can grow brittle with age as people set into their ways and rhythms. So when a new voice gets injected into an old script, it can make or break the very foundations of the friendship. In this case, it even ends in death.

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Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? | State Theatre Company South Australia

Image by Yaya Stempler

Edward Albee’s searing critique of 1960s American polite society is a classic but that doesn’t exclude it from examination as time, opinion, and attitudes change. In this production the text gets held up to the light, prodded a bit; does this thing still hold up? Does it still ring true?

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Slow Burn | Q Theatre

Bushfires are a familiar summer phenomenon in Australia but, if you’re among the majority of lucky Australians, you don’t see much beyond the nightly news segments and brief interview soundbites from survivors. What does a bushfire do to a community or a family? How might the shock of loss shape the rest of someone’s life?

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44 Sex Acts in One Week | Club House Productions

Image by Brett Boardman

After the success of Kill Climate Deniers in 2018, playwright David Finnigan again brings climate change explicitly to the stage with a story full of raunchy, raucous characters and extreme circumstances. This time environmentalism comes up against click-bait sexuality when a young writer finds herself caught in the middle of art v capitalism and control v pleasure.

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宿 (stay) | Kurinji & SAtheCollective with OzAsia Festival

Image by Jacquie Manning

History is an inescapable force. It settles deep into the soil and reverberates forward through time. In this new multidisciplinary collaborative production that spans Australia and Singapore, the consequences of a generations-old crime crop up in the lives of three seemingly unrelated women. What about their past is hiding in plain sight?

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