5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche | Theatre Travels

Image by Becky Matthews

Clubs and societies, especially ones centred around “women’s” activities like knitting and baking, are often the butt of jokes about spinsters or old biddies but people forget what a safe haven, sometimes life-saving service these communities provide. 5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche takes it back to the heyday of CWA stereotypes to find humour in dire circumstances.

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Symphonie Fantastique | Little Eggs Collective

Image by Patrick Boland

Desire and power: it’s a tale as old as time played out countlessly in the artist/muse dynamic. “Symphonie fantastique” by Hector Berlioz is one such example of a multi-layered attempt to capture the fluttering beauty of unrequited love. Using this 19th century composition as the inspiration, Little Eggs Collective inject some queer imaginary and disco fever for a hallucinatory story of revenge.

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Fag/Stag | Lambert House Enterprises & Les Solomon

Image by David Hooley

The dynamics of male friendships for a long time were a bit of a black hole for artistic and entertainment industries with movies and tv very rarely diving deeper than buddy cops. But as terms like hyper-masculinity and toxic masculinity have entered mainstream vocabulary, works like Fag/Stag have emerged to mine the emotional depths behind grunting and backslaps.

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The Pass | Fixed Foot Productions & Seymour Centre

Image by Becky Matthews

Australia loves sport. It turns teams into families, players into warriors, and games into wars. And, as much as some people use sport for escapism, the industry has a long history of perpetuating, ignoring, or failing to engage adequately with global concerns of racism, homophobia, and toxic masculinity. The Pass flips the script, using elite sport as the backdrop to riffle around in these issues and their intersections with success, sacrifice, and authenticity.

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Crown Matrimonial | the Guild Theatre

The popularity of Netflix’s The Crown and the enormous media attention around Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding in 2018 demonstrate that there is still plenty of interest in the British Royal Family in the 21st century. Crown Matrimonial could even be considered a precursor to The Crown, taking as its focus an earlier Royal scandal: the abdication of King Edward VIII.

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Things I Know to Be True | Castle Hill Players

Image by Chris Lundie

Small towns are known for their quiet, steady atmospheres where not much changes. For the Price Family of Halett Cove, that’s been true for 25 years. But this year everything’s in upheaval from affairs and coming outs to heartbreak and resolved regrets.

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Beautiful Thing | New Theatre

Image by Bob Seary

Being a teenager is brutal with the nagging parents, unstable friendships, and general boredom of school but it’s all heightened by the raging hormones and overwhelming pressure to figure yourself out as quickly as possible. Jonathan Harvey’s 1993 play is all about teenage angst but with the sparkling joys of love and understanding, too.

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Dorr-e Dari: A Poetic Crash Course in the Language of Love | PYT Fairfield

Image by Anna Kucera

It seems every few months another newspaper publishes a think-piece about how technology or millennials are degrading language and the art of communication. In this confessional lecture-style theatre piece, three poetry enthusiasts unravel the thousand-years-old tradition of Persian poetry as a courtship ritual, a fortune teller, and a wise guide to life.

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William Shakespeare’s Long Lost First Play (Abridged) | the Genesian Theatre

Image by Tom Massey

Reduced Shakespeare Company have made quite a name for themselves by reducing enormous works of theatre and literature into short and witty stage plays. After the success of Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) the company added to their repertoire William Shakespeare’s Long Lost First Play (Abridged).

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Maureen: Harbinger of Death | Jonny Hawkins & Nell Ranney

Image by Yaya Stempler

There’s a phenomenon often discussed amongst women where you reach a certain age and suddenly become invisible. Because you’ve passed through the three layers of societally recognised womanhood, (ie virgin, desirable, mother), you’re no longer relevant or worthy of attention. In this new show, creators Jonny Hawkins and Nell Ranney turn all the attention to older women and pay tribute to their stories in a conglomerate homage character named Maureen the Harbinger of Death.

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