Yung Lung | Chunky Move

Image by Yaya Stempler

Every few months someone on Twitter will dig up a famously ironic quote from scientist Clifford Stoll in a 1995 MPR interview discussing the future of the Internet: “I think it’s grossly oversold and within two or three years people will shrug and say, ‘Uh yep, it was a fad of the early 90’s and now, oh yeah, it still exists but hey, I’ve got a life to lead and work to do. I don’t have time to waste online.'” Thinking about how wrong he was is either funny or chilling, depending on your own predictions for the future.

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Grey Rhino | Charmene Yap & Cass Mortimer Eipper with Performing Lines

Image by Daniel Boud

American policy analyst Michele Wucker in her 2016 book the Gray Rhino referred to dangers people choose to ignore as “A highly probable, high-impact threat: something we ought to see coming, like a two-tonne rhinoceros aiming its horn in our direction and preparing to charge.” Inspired by this quote Grey Rhino explores the way people deny, ignore, and procrastinate on impending problems to their own detriment.

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宿 (stay) | Kurinji & SAtheCollective with OzAsia Festival

Image by Jacquie Manning

History is an inescapable force. It settles deep into the soil and reverberates forward through time. In this new multidisciplinary collaborative production that spans Australia and Singapore, the consequences of a generations-old crime crop up in the lives of three seemingly unrelated women. What about their past is hiding in plain sight?

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Set Piece | Anna Breckon & Nat Randall with Performance Space

Image by Prudence Upton

What thrills many people about theatre is its proximity to real life: real people walking around real space in real time. In this new piece by co-creators Anna Breckon and Nat Randall, the conglomerate form of theatre and film presses on the boundaries of intimacy and relation including the relationships between the actors on stage and the audience in the wings.

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Dorr-e Dari: A Poetic Crash Course in the Language of Love | PYT Fairfield

Image by Anna Kucera

It seems every few months another newspaper publishes a think-piece about how technology or millennials are degrading language and the art of communication. In this confessional lecture-style theatre piece, three poetry enthusiasts unravel the thousand-years-old tradition of Persian poetry as a courtship ritual, a fortune teller, and a wise guide to life.

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Humans 2.0 | Circa

Image by Yaya Stempler

Much of circus is about the spectacle; making unbelievable feats of human strength and agility effortless and entertaining. After the success of Humans at Sydney Festival in 2017, Circa returns with the revamped Humans 2.0 which examines touch, intimacy, connection in the wake of COVID-19.

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AutoCannibal | Oozing Future

Image by Yaya Stempler

We see a lot of references flying around comparing our current circumstances to post-apocalyptic or dystopian imaginaries like 1984 or Brave New World. In AutoCannibal, Mitch Jones stretches contemporary crises of environmental collapse, the refugee crisis, and poverty to their extreme dystopic conclusion: self-cannibalism.

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The Last Season | Force Majeure

Image by Yaya Stempler

In modern times it feels like every season brings a new crisis whether economic, social, environmental, or a combination of all three. Using Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons as inspiration, Force Majeure’s The Last Season explores intergenerational relationships through the increasing pressures on society as we know it.

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Future Remains | Sydney Chamber Opera

Image by Lisa Tomasetti

Beginning with an unsettling and predatory story of infatuation and ending in wild violent abandon, this mash-up performance of Leoš Janáček’s Diary of One Who Disappeared and Huw Belling’s response piece Fumeblind Oracle combine to explore classical themes of desire and revenge under strobing lights.

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poem for a dried up river | Jane Sheldon & Sydney Chamber Opera

Image by Lisa Tomasetti

The environment and its vast network of interconnected systems often get discussed in enormous scales of time, space, and impact. For the average person, comprehending these huge scales is daunting. In poem for a dried up river, Jane Sheldon and Sydney Chamber Opera collaborate to experiment with mixing big and small in the story of a tiny creature’s Herculean task.

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