Significant Other | New Theatre

Image by Bob Seary

We are conditioned to want, or even expect, the fairytale romance culminating in marriage and a happily ever after with kids. Whether it’s romcoms, social norms, or capitalism, the pressure to fulfil these expectations is enormous. For some it’s a matter of casting off that narrative and seeking something else but what if you do want the fairytale and you just can’t get it?

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The Removalists | New Theatre

Image by Bob Seary for New Theatre

A woman turns to the police for assistance when her husband assaults her. The police take the opportunity to puff their chests and wield their power. David Williamson’s the Removalists is exemplary of the playwright’s successes and shortcomings in a brutal, violent exploration of power and toxic masculinity.

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Glengarry Glen Ross | New Theatre

Image by Chris Lundie

It’s the 80s and the air is thick with money; the promise of endless American economic growth just recently cut down by a recession. But the greed is still palpable and it’s gaining momentum amongst the desperate Chicago real estate agents of David Mamet’s imagination.

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Beautiful Thing | New Theatre

Image by Bob Seary

Being a teenager is brutal with the nagging parents, unstable friendships, and general boredom of school but it’s all heightened by the raging hormones and overwhelming pressure to figure yourself out as quickly as possible. Jonathan Harvey’s 1993 play is all about teenage angst but with the sparkling joys of love and understanding, too.

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Twelfth Night (heads or tails) | New Theatre

Image by Clare Hawley

After the year we had in 2020, we could all use a bit of a laugh. Cue one of the oldest comedy writers out there with the classic tale of love, deception, mistaken identities, and twins! But, this time, with a twist.

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Picnic at Hanging Rock | New Theatre

Image by Bob Seary

The story of Picnic at Hanging Rock has haunted the Australian conscious for decades. The original novel spurred on multiple film and stage adaptations as well as a musical, radio play, and miniseries. This most recent stage adaptation by Tom Wright condenses the atmosphere of the iconic tale and heightens its drama exponentially.

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Animal Farm | New Theatre

Image by Bob Seary

The last few years have felt particularly prophetic as the global timeline twists in on itself with the rise of fascism in the west, the collapse of democracy in Hong Kong, the civil rights movement of Black Lives Matter, and the “unprecedented” times of COVID-19 which saw responses from political leaders uncannily similar to the AIDS crisis and the 1918 flu pandemic. So it’s not surprising to see artists turn to the well-worn narratives of George Orwell as an imperfect mirror for the cycle of oppression and revolution we’re living through.

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Neighbourhood Watch | New Theatre

Image by Chris Lundie

Mary St is a perfectly ordinary suburban street with perfectly ordinary residents. The only thing missing is perhaps a bit of community spirit, the comfort of having someone keeping an eye on your business. But when two relative newbie neighbours strike up a friendship, the close quarters create more friction than expected.

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Angry Fags | New Theatre

Image by Chris Lundie

Since Hilary Clinton’s loss to Donald Trump in the 2016 US Presidential Election, the distinction between left and right politics and the reporting of each have become increasingly inflammatory and divisive. The Democratic Party have encountered harsh criticism for their inability to play dirty, to not compromise. But what would it look like for the left to try something new? Perhaps something extreme?

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1984! The Musical! | New Theatre

George Orwell’s dystopian political satire has had a resurgence of popularity since the 2016 US Presidential Election, the revelation of Facebook’s interest in spreading misinformation, and the generalised fascist-y turn global politics has taken recently. This new adaptation looks specifically to the funny side of surveillance and turns the 1949 novel into a comedy and a musical.

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