M.ROCK | Australian Theatre for Young People

Image by Tracey Schramm

Ageing is a rocky road, whether you’re a teen entering adulthood with a world opening up that you hardly understand, or you’re on the other end of the spectrum and you feel the world closing in around you with each encroaching year. Grandmother and granddaughter Mudge both want to know what life has in store for them but they didn’t realise they’d have to go to Berlin to find out.

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The Ugliest Duckling | Q Theatre

It’s a tale as old as time; a story most children would have heard a version of, about an unusual duckling who didn’t quite fit in. Q Theatre’s adaptation of the Hans Christian Andersen classic uses physical theatre to explore difference and acceptance.

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Made to Measure | Seymour Centre

Image by Lisa Tomasetti

Weddings as moments of great personal and cultural significance are often very emotional experiences from the engagement to the bachelor/bachelorette parties and all the little rituals that go into the big day. For marginalised people, people who are not reflected in bridal magazines or represented in bridal shops, and who don’t even appear in trashy wedding reality shows, organising a wedding can encompass an additional range of emotions that damper the joy and frivolity of the occasion. Alana Valentine’s new play Made to Measure confronts the experience of trying to celebrate yourself in a world that won’t celebrate with you.

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Fierce | Red Line Productions

FIERCE 5

Image by Clare Hawley

Suzie Flack has eschewed “women’s” sport for the real, original, men’s league of AFL. She has always been as good as the boys, ie better than the girls, and she wants her chance to prove herself as the first woman to ever play for the men’s team. Fierce is a complex examination of gender, bodies, ability, and want within the all-Australian realm of professional sport.

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Good Cook. Friendly. Clean. | Griffin Theatre Company

Following middle-aged Sandra as she battles through the Sydney housing shortage after her housemates give her two weeks to leave, Brooke Robinson’s new work introduces a critical conversation to the Sydney stage. When we’re all familiar with the housing crisis on a macro scale through rising house prices and sales of car-sized land going for millions of dollars, Good Cook. Friendly. Clean. is a confronting portrayal of the personal cost for someone who slips through the cracks and is routinely denied basic human necessities.

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