Alone | Dusty Room Productions & Glow House Ltd

What’s it going to take to save the Earth and, more specifically, the human race from climate change? Moving to Mars? Building a large enough space craft to hold the entire population? Or maybe a tiny little micro-organism found on a far distant planet that eats carbon at an unbelievable rate? The flight crew of the Lily of the Nile have staked everything on that little purple plant but first they have to bring it safely home.

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Rough Trade | Joy Minter & Sydney Fringe Festival

Image by Clare Hawley

Nobody likes Mark Zuckerberg and many people translate their dislike into deleting the ubiquitous Facebook app. But for many others, the social media platform remains an essential tool for connection and, for some others, survival. They gather in groups like Rough Trade, developing community that traverses digital and real life divides.

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Nothing | National Theatre of Parramatta

Image by Noni Carroll Photography

There is something particularly chilling about listening to children work through some of life’s great conundrums like unfairness or death. They haven’t adopted either the niceties or the distracting justifications upon which adults couch these conversations so the ideas are laid bare and shocking. In Nothing, adapted for the stage by Pelle Koppel from the controversial 2000 novel by Janne Teller, a group of children grapple with perhaps the largest question of all: the meaning of life.

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Heaven for Worms (for people) | Tim Dunk

We can thank pharmaceutical companies for a lot of things: vaccinations, the US Opioid Epidemic, and making life-saving medications prohibitively expensive in order to turn some of the largest profits in the world. It turns out they’re also working on creating super humans!

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Borderlands: Two Short Plays by Tommy James Green | Sydney Fringe Festival

Borders are intrinsically confrontational places where worlds, cultures, and expectations collide. In two short plays by Tommy James Green, characters meet on borders with troubling demands, sparking both violence and unexpected connections.

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Killing Rove | Patrick Marlborough

Is anyone else struggling right now? With climate change, crashing economies, the explosion of online grifters, and that pesky COVID-19 pandemic hanging over everyday, do you long for the early days of the century when Australia was merely a global laughingstock for regularly platforming blackface on national broadcasts? You are not alone.

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Razor Gang Wars: The Rise of Tilly Devine & Kate Leigh | Actors Anonymous & Blancmange Productions

Image by Phyllis Photography

It’s been a few years since Deadhouse: Tales of Sydney Morgue dove into the underground history of Sydney’s streets but this third season turns its focus on the infamous and iconic duo of Tilly Devine and Kate Leigh. But while Tilly and Kate were making names for themselves as famous female criminals, there were women on the other side of the law taking advantage of their own opportunities.

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Through the Cracks | EDGE Spaces

Image by Ashley de Prazer

A woman goes missing and no one knows how or why. On the surface she was a perfectly normal middle-aged woman, so what went wrong? In an immersive, interactive detective mystery, the audience helps Inspector Tilly find the clues to this disappearance buried deep the in the ephemera of the victim’s life.

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Tom at the Farm | Fixed Foot Productions with bAKEHOUSE

Image by Becky Matthews

Tom arrives at a rural farmhouse with the expectations of an uncomfortable but predictable encounter with his deceased partner’s family. His presence, though, unravels a long string of lies and secrecy stretching from William’s childhood into their relationship, right up until he died. Perhaps even more unexpected, though, is what Tom learns about himself deep in the muck of the farm.

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Bernie Dieter’s Club Kabarett | Zaccaria & Dead Man Label

Image by Alistair Veryard

The talents on display in Bernie Dieter’s Club Kabarett recall the heyday of Victorian freak shows and carnival sideshows, but with a slight twist in which the gawking audience imparts a kind of power to the performer as they writhe, twist, and spin on stage. As the Ring Mistress, Bernie encourages a dissolution of barriers between the weirdness on show and that hidden in the audience for a rompy, rowdy night of sensual debauchery.

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