Silenced | Vocovox

In 2004, while accepting the Sydney Peace Prize at the University of Sydney, novelist and political activist Arundhati Roy said, “There’s really no such thing as the ‘voiceless’. There are only the deliberately silenced, or the preferably unheard.” She was pushing back against the myth that oppressed groups are voiceless and need others to speak for them by acknowledging that the gaps in the discourse or debate or historical record are actually deliberate omissions and erasures. Silenced picks up on the same concerns and grapples with the social, professional, and political consequences of being one of the silenced, specifically of being a woman under patriarchy.

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Charles & Larry | Secret House

Image by Clare Hawley

Charles and Larry are still brothers even if they haven’t seen each other for 10 years. Neither of their lives have gone entirely to plan but maybe reconnecting will open up much needed space for healing and forgiveness. Or it’ll have them both spiralling backwards. It’s worth trying, though, right?

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Hush | New Ghosts Theatre Company

Image by Clare Hawley

It’s symbolic that a play about difficult birthing stories would have such a protracted pregnancy spanning from Lucy Clement’s idea in 2019 to the stage in 2022 after multiple postponements due to the pandemic. But the frustrating process reflected the feelings of uncertainty, fear, disappointment, and resentment in these women’s experiences, the sides not often shared about motherhood.

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Taz vs The Pleb | Rogue Projects & Kasia Vickery

Image by Noni Carroll Photography

This year will mark five years since the Australian Marriage Postal Survey in which the government took a plebiscite of all Australian citizens to gauge support of legalising same-sex marriage. It was a deeply traumatic time for the LGBTQIA+ community as the debate of their rights was put on a national stage and explicitly inserted into their everyday interactions with neighbours, coworkers, and family.

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TattleTales | Ponydog Productions

Image by Ezekiel Rodofili

For thousands of years people have been building connections through rituals and one of the most enduring rituals is storytelling. In this immersive and interactive production, the audience is invited into the show to construct their own unique story together, a story never told before or since.

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Morning Star: First Horn | Flight Path Theatre

Image by Kate Wooden

Hannah Arendt’s theory on the banality of evil has become part of the common vernacular when considering the darker side of humanity; the way the whispers of cruelty seep into people undetected until the unthinkable happens. In the two-part production Morning Star, a group of writers imagine the consequences of pernicious ideas infiltrating otherwise unremarkable narratives.

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Yielding & Big Horn | Crying Chair Theatre

Image by Andrea Mudbidri

Ageing is a great privilege for those who get the chance but that doesn’t make it easy. Ill health, loneliness, and loss of autonomy are just some of the difficult issues to navigate in old age. In this double bill from Crying Chair Theatre, two families face great changes and must reconcile their past years with those ahead.

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Fuente Ovejuna | Dream Plane Productions

Image by Clare Hawley

It’s the kind of story that rallies people together and strikes fear into the hearts of the rich and powerful: the downtrodden rise up and right the wrongs done to them by their oppressors. In the case of Fuente Ovejuna, the history is true. In Angus Evans’s new adaptation of the Spanish classic, the patterns of revolution ring out across time and place.

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The Shape of Things | Lambert House Enterprises & Les Solomon

Image by David Hooley

What is attraction really? Is it all about aesthetics or is there a deeper meaning underneath the surface? And is there a different rule book for art? Neil LaBute’s the Shape of Things mixes the messages of art and attraction amongst four flirty twenty-somethings.

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Molly Sweeney | Clock & Spiel Productions

Image by Anjelica Murdaca

It’s an age-old adage that the grass is always greener on the other side. Envy is a routine emotion; we always want what we don’t, or can’t, have. But Brian Friel’s play about a young family in Ireland presents the case for someone else’s insistence on your deficiency and the untold consequences of imposing envy on someone else.

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