Emerald City | Riverside Theatres Digital

Image by Brett Boardman

Melbourne and Sydney, art and commercialism, love and money; whether it’s the 1980s, 2014, or 2021, the battle is the same with each side deeply entrenched in their beliefs about success and happiness. In David Williamson’s 1987 play, artists butt up against producers, funding bodies, and even the audiences all for the integrity of the art. But what’s really at stake?

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Is There Something Wrong with that Lady? | Griffin Theatre Company

Image by Brett Boardman

The image of the tortured artist is a popular one; the sad sack, the alcoholic, the neurotic recluse. But even for artists who might be considered “normal”, there remains the rather insistent self-doubt: “Why am I doing this?” In Debra Oswald’s solo memoir performance, she explores the life events leading to her career as a writer and the many, many trials she’s faced over that career.

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The Almighty Sometimes | Griffin Theatre Company

Anna is 18 and, while she hasn’t gone to uni or really figured out a plan at all, she wants to take control of her life. Part of this includes no longer taking the medication she’s been on for her entire adolescence in order to reclaim an earlier, more authentic version of herself. This isn’t a decision just for her, though, as a new boyfriend, her mother, and her long-term psychiatrist complicate the practicalities of mental health and being unwell.

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Kill Climate Deniers | Griffin Theatre Company

Kill Climate Deniers is a new Australian political satire about the state of the political, scientific, and social discourse around climate change in our country. It depicts a group of eco-terrorists storming Parliament House during a Fleetwood Mac concert in order to hold the audience, including the Minister for the Environment, hostage and demand the Australian government put an immediate stop to global climate change. Written by David Finnigan, it won the 2017 Griffin Playwrights Award.

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